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Trending News and Stories in the World of GPS Fleet Tracking

Fuel And Vehicle Efficiency In A Time Of Low Costs

04/24/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Stanford economist Frank Wolak estimates the global price of oil will sustain at its current low cost of $50 to $70 per barrel for the next 10 to 20 years. And with these low fuel prices, some in the trucking industry are reconsidering the economics of investment in fuel efficiency and alternative fuels—and investing more in the assets they currently own.  

When fuel is expensive, investing in newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles or alternative fuel fleets makes a lot of sense. It can be a great investment in the future of your business. However, as fuel costs drop, and the production of domestic U.S. oil is on the rise, the wisdom of such investments starts to look a little less obvious. The savings accumulated from low fuel costs can strategically be invested in the assets you already own. As long as they are in compliance with emissions standards, trucking companies can save money and maintain their older vehicles.

And regardless of the financial climate, GPS tracking software can even help reduce fuel consumption and decrease the risk of vehicle depreciation.

A big part of how much fuel a vehicle uses is the skill of the driver and the condition of the vehicle. Real-time tracking catches speeding, abrupt breaking, and excessive idling, all of which increase fuel use—and recordings of these behaviors via telematics make great training tools to help drivers improve their behavior.

To assist drivers, dispatchers use GPS software to locate in real time the most efficient routes and easily assign jobs to the closest drivers. And drivers can in turn communicate directly with dispatchers and their office to get help and confirm jobs so that deliveries are made in a timely and productive manner.

Most importantly, high company costs are many times associated with vehicle abuse and accidents. Telematics can provide valuable information on a vehicle’s mechanical condition so that trucks get the timely maintenance they need to not only run properly, but also keep drivers safe. Instant event replays additionally allow fleet owners to see where and when a vehicle encountered problems. And provide the best insight into a vehicles mechanical condition and external factors that can impact its wear and tear.

With the money saved from low fuel costs, think twice about throwing away your old vehicles to buy new ones. Investing in software that can help maintain the assets you already have can be an even larger money saver.

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Telematics- The Pulse of the Economy in Real Time

04/24/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Business leaders have always sought to understand the movements of the economy so they can plan intelligently for the future. The problem is that most economic indicators are slightly out of date. Most of them show past results from data nearly one month old, making it a challenge to accurately form opinions and decisions about prospective actions in their business. Telematics on the other hand, offers a way to look into the future, and get a more up-to-date picture of the economic present.

Telematics services collect accurate, real-time data for fleet owners. One important piece of information is mileage data gathered from fleets which gives a truck fleet owner the capability of tracking economic activity in real time to see which stores need more goods and how many trucks need to make deliveries. Traditional retail data only picks up the measurable activity after money changes hands, which typically only becomes available at least a month after the transaction. Delivery truck mileage however reflects consumer interest as it happens.

To view this exchange thoroughly, Dr. Stephen Fuller, director of the Center for Regional Analysis at George Mason University  tested whether telematics data agrees with economic data derived from other sources.  Dr. Fuller compared this one provider’s accumulated information to retail sales data from Moody’s and the U.S. Census Bureau. The two datasets covered the same four-year period.

And the results? With accumulated performance metrics that provided insights into the buying and selling of goods and services, the two datasets did indeed correlate very closely.

While this study only involved telematics data from one provider, it did pool information from many different carriers to include daily number of stops per vehicle, miles per stop per vehicle, and number of vehicles per region. The study concluded that retail sales are in fact dependent on the activity of fleets. When the collected number of miles driven by small fleet service carriers increased, retail sales numbers increased as well.

It is apparent that the performance of service vehicle fleets is an important factor in meeting business goals, and subsequently maintaining a healthy  economy. With GPS tracking technology, the best travel routes are displayed so that deliveries can be made on time. Fleet owners can have full access to their assets and drivers while they are on the road to make sure they are being efficient and safe, thus making their business productive and the business on the receiving end profitable. Telematics opens the door to instant data gathering that captures both business and consumer attitudes, and may prove to be a reliable tool to track the pulse of the economy.  

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3 Unique Ways to Attract Young Drivers

04/24/2015 by Sarah Barbod

The national economy is growing. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, the GDP increased 2.2 percent in the fourth quarter of 2014. With this growth, trucking companies are racing to find drivers as their veteran driver population, mostly in the 50 year old age range, prepare to retire. But less than 2% of drivers nationally are under 25 years old, and less than 8% are under the age of 30.

Over the past decade, the industry has hardly grown its workforce.  Those numbers are a problem, in part because of the lifestyle of the job is a very physically demanding role sitting hours on end and continuously traveling far from home. Young workers tend to prefer regional jobs with a balanced work/life experience. Furthermore, the lure of other industries like technology offer high salaries and better work hours.

So how do you attract young drivers to the trucking profession?

Higher pay is always a great incentive. According to data from the American Trucking Associations (ATA) and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, annual average pay for general freight truck drivers was below $45,000 last year. Drivers who acquire specialized training and authorization to haul dangerous equipment can earn more, up to $70,000 annually and up.

For carriers, the challenge is both to attract applicants who might not otherwise have become truck drivers, but also to compete with other carriers for the few people who do enter the industry. As the demand for drivers is on the rise, drivers will not hesitate to leave a company if they think they can get a better deal someplace else. Smart employers will make sure they are the ones offering the best salary and benefits package to keep the staff they currently have, and recruit new drivers.

New technology is on the rise and carriers are utilizing various electronics to combat the long hours on the road. Two-way messaging with smart in-vehicle displays enables drivers to communicate in real time with dispatch and maintain a constant connection with the office.

Maintaining this connection allows drivers to stay safe and calm, and deliver goods on time.

Lastly, a mentorship program can help support new recruits and offer extra training and guidance. A trucking career requires a commercial driver’s license and no college degree. The Department of Motor Vehicles’ legal age requirement for a CDL is 18 years old to apply, and only 21 years old to haul hazardous materials. For many of these young drivers, this may be their first professional experience. And having the right mentor can help steer them into a prosperous career in the trucking industry.

The entire industry suffers when new, young drivers do not get behind the wheel and invest in a career in the industry. It is equally important for carriers to make an investment in their employees and offer rewarding employment packages.  

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How Does the FMCSA Work?

04/24/2015 by Shazia Haq

We often speak and write of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) as if it were a single entity, but in practical terms the agency is not always so unified.

FMCSA has a network of regional offices that do much of the agency’s work, plus over half of FMCSA’s total budget goes into the Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP), which partially funds state and local programs of various kinds. Ideally, all the different programs and sub-agencies that operate under FMCSA’s umbrella operate in the same way by the same rules so that all carriers have a level playing field and a consistent set of expectations wherever in the company they occupy.

But differences in interpretation of the rules are inevitable and there is no established process to discover and reconcile discrepancies. The Department of Transportation does not conduct audits of how well state and local agencies enact its policies. People who believe a state or local body has ruled against their carriers in error can appeal, but the appeals process is handled entirely within the state, which does not help if the state authorities have misunderstood the rule in the first place.

The result is that some states are much harsher on issues such as speeding than others, so that carriers operating in those states end up with poorer official safety and compliance records than similar carriers that operate exactly the same way in less rigorous states. Further, because these jurisdictional variations result from differences in interpretation, not differences in the regulations themselves, there is no way for anyone in the industry to look up the regional differences and adjust their practices so as to stay on the right side of the authorities.

Curiously, the same lack of review and feedback systems in FMCSA, and especially within the MCSAP, also makes it harder for the agency to be sure its efforts work as designed. The same data that could let the agency know whether regulatory changes actually lead to better outcomes could also let agency leaders know about enforcement discrepancies that need to be resolved.

For example, while there are those willing to speak out on regulation changes, such as Hours of Service guidelines, how those regulations get enforced is often ignored. Perhaps that should change.

For FMCSA, as for the rest of us, it’s not so much what you say as how you say it. 

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What To Expect In A Compliance Audit

04/09/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Trucking companies know they can expect to be audited by the Department of Transportation (DOT) now and then. What many people do not realize is that any person or organization in any industry that is involved in transportation is subject to DOT regulations. That includes companies for which transporting cargo or people is a strictly supportive function, as long as the vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or more. That means the auditors could show up.

The best way to prepare for an audit is to make sure the fleet is in compliance with all applicable regulations. Knowing what the auditors are going to look for also helps.

There are four types of DOT safety audits, each of which involves a different checklist of concerns. There are new entrant audits, compliance reviews, security reviews, and hazardous materials reviews. All four typically happen without prior notice.

New entrant reviews happen sometime within three to six months after a company starts using its USDOT number. It is comprehensive, covering all 11 of the DOT’s areas of concern, but the objective is only to discover if the company understands the law. The auditor will not do a thorough review of each area.

The 11 areas of concern are: shipping documents, driver qualifications, hours of service, vehicle inspection and maintenance, accident register, hazmat registration, drug testing program, accident register, hazmat register, drug testing program, security plan, review of motor carrier operations.

Compliance reviews also cover all 11 areas of concern, but at greater depth. This is a thorough review of all relevant records and evidence in order to ensure the company is not violating the regulations in some way.

Security reviews are in-depth audit of only those areas directly related to security. In practice, this means all areas of concern except placarding, HazMat registration, and the drug testing program. If the company transports hazardous materials, a hazardous materials review will probably be conducted at the same time. These cover all areas of concern except the drug testing program, again in depth.

The details of safety audits—what the auditor is looking for, what types of audits are conducted, and under what circumstances—sometimes change as the regulations are updated. It is important to stay current on these details, for obvious reasons. The best way to ensure that any audit will be as stress-free as possible is to stay compliant with the regulations in the first place.

Pine Logistics, a family owned transportation company based in Massachusetts recently went through an arduous FMCSA audit. The company caters to the small and medium sized business, proving customized solutions to fit unique shipping needs of companies across a range of industries. According to the company, “We are able to work with shippers in ways the big guys can’t; with tailor-made solutions to move freight in [efficiently].” The company uses GPS fleet tracking in order to meet Hours of Service regulations and to manage safety issues. The company's GPS investment paid off during the audit. They passed with flying colors. The FMCSA told Pine Logistics, "We're glad to see you’re using [GPS fleet tracking].” A good note for any company gearing for an upcoming compliance inspection. 

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Lightening the Load

04/08/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Trucks are gaining weight these days.

New emissions requirements introduced in 2007 and 2010 have come at a price as the changes to engine design added about 800 pounds to each Class 8 tractor. Other design changes over the same period added perhaps as much as 400 more pounds. Meanwhile, higher fuel prices have shippers packing their loads as tightly as possible in order to minimize the number of trips they have to pay for—and the denser loads make for still heavier trucks.

The extra weight is a problem from several perspectives. Most obviously, Class 8 vehicles are subject to weight limits. For carriers who already gross out on a regular basis, heavier trucks and denser loads mean they have to reduce load size in order to stay under the legal limit. That equals less money. Further, heavier trucks need more fuel, which again costs money and increases greenhouse gas emissions.

Anything that can reverse the trend and reduce vehicle weight will be an obvious boon to the industry, especially for those carries that bump up against the legal weight limit. Less weight will mean more room for cargo, better fuel efficiency, and more room in the weight budget for still more fuel-efficient engine components. Weight reduction is therefore a win/win all around and there are companies working on making it happen.

GPS tracking cannot, all by itself, make a truck lighter, but it can still definitely take a load off.

In a pinch, GPS equipped trucks can save a little weight by carrying less fuel between refueling stops. GPS tracking works as a training tool to help instill good driving habits, such as staying under the speed limit. Better, safer drivers mean much more fuel-efficient driving. Tracking also makes it easier for drivers to navigate around areas of heavy traffic or road construction, thus saving even more fuel.

Better navigation makes driving more efficient in terms of time and risk as well. Drivers can use GPS to easily identify the shortest, fastest route available. Customers know when a load is arriving. If a problem develops, such as bad weather forcing slower travel, the driver can communicate with dispatch and adjust the schedule. In the event of theft or serious accident, emergency personnel can find the vehicle quickly and recover the cargo—and, of course, rescue the driver, if necessary.

All of that adds up to more reliable and valuable service, which translates directly into lower costs and more income. Then, if a truck does have to carry a light load to save on weight, it doesn’t matter quite so much.

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Improving Efficiency In Government Vehicles

04/03/2015 by Dennis Jaconi

Vehicle fleets are an important part of many government agencies, but many are not being managed as efficiently and effectively as possible. Common problems include aging fleets, poor maintenance records, and poor cooperation among fleets belonging to the same agency. With the proper tools, including a nimble GPS fleet tracking platform, government agencies can alleviate these issues and see a real change in their fleet operations.

Rejuvenating equipment

Fleets are often low priority in public agencies. This is due, in part, to the belief that the fleet vehicles compete with the agency’s mission for funds. Fleets, of course, actually exist to support their agencies, and aging fleets and equipment constitute a real drain on these programs.

Older vehicles cost more to maintain and bring in less money when resold. With a fleet management tool, agencies can keep an eye on their vehicles’ health, make timely vehicle replacements and keep costs down. Fleet managers can make their case for sufficient funding by pointing out the costs of delay and making clear that prompt replacements will actually free up budget space over time.  

Prioritizing maintenance

It’s usually better to perform vehicle maintenance sooner rather than later. Fleet managers can stand up for their vehicles by showing fleet management software data to their colleagues. Tracking vehicles shows unambiguously which parts need replacement and can prevent expensive repair costs. This is especially important in government agencies, which often operate on a tight budget.

Data collection and management are important in other contexts as well. Fuel efficiency and driver safety increase dramatically when managers have access to tracking data and can use telematics as a guide for training and policy development.

Cooperation and leadership

Some agencies have multiple fleets, each with its own budget, facilities, and chain of command.  While different tasks often do require different vehicles, agencies can save time and costs by sharing fuel and other resources. Consolidating these functions might require substantial reorganization but will lead to substantial savings. Fleet management software can help ease this transition, helping managers identify fuel usage and inefficiencies.

Fleet managers need to also maintain their authority, denying requests if they cannot be reasonably met. This, too may require some reorganization but will lead to a better-functioning fleet.

The takeaway

Government agency fleets need to be as well-organized and efficient as an independent business. With the proper GPS tracking software, fleet managers can reduce operating and maintenance costs, intelligently allocate resources, and make their vehicles true assets to their agency’s mission.

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How GPS Tracking Software Helps Improve CSA Scores and Increase Safety

03/26/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

The trucking industry’s top concern is safety, and so is the US government’s. The CSA (Compliance, Safety, and Accountability) program, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) response to address this issue, went into effect in 2010. The idea was to make America’s roads safer by making it easier to measure which commercial truck drivers—and carriers—practice safe driving. 

While the program added no new safety requirements, it created new incentives for businesses to look into smart ways to curb unsafe driving without the CSA having to intervene first. Often, businesses don’t realize that without a solid monitoring system in place, it’s almost impossible to track safety within a fleet, which could increase the risk of scoring high during CSA inspections. That’s why tools like GPS tracking software are a good investment to ensure that safety remains a priority item for these businesses, reducing costly violations and increasing road safety.

Although the CSA helps keep track of safety problems for each driver and employer through a point system (BASICs), these evaluations happen only a few times a year. And no one from the CSA records the specifics of a driver’s safety record. 

To keep a low CSA score, fleet managers must proactively ensure that their drivers are as safe as possible—which is, of course, exactly what businesses should do anyway. Cutting corners gets expensive in the long term.

Doing the right thing is even easier than it looks. Some of the most serious infractions that earn points involve exhausted driving. When drivers get inspected, it is usually because they were speeding or driving erratically. GPS fleet tracking provider Teletrac offers safety features and tools to help fleet managers keep tabs on individual drivers and stop poor habits before they snowball into a bigger and expensive problem.

Teletrac’s Hours-of-Service (HOS) solution is one proactive tool that businesses use to maintain a record of all driver hours, ensuring that drivers take the rest breaks they need. Drivers can use electronic driver logs (E-Logs) to enter their work hours and submit right from their in-vehicle driver displays, providing added assurance that drivers are practicing safety. 

In addition, Teletrac offers Safety Analytics, which helps businesses receive a safety analysis of their entire fleet, allowing them to take action on the spot. Safety events, such as vehicle speeding, excessive braking, even when a vehicle runs a stop sign, are recorded as they happened in real time. This play-by-play feature lets managers identify the drivers who need extra training. The recordings even work well as coaching tools and provide an opportunity for the driver to explain any extenuating circumstances.

Together, these tools and preventative measures are good for drivers and fleet managers. Fleet managers have an easier time keeping track of the safety records of their drivers, and drivers benefit from better training, more recognition of their skill and good behavior, and, of course, violations decrease and roads are safer.

 

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Training America’s Professional Drivers

03/12/2015 by Shazia Haq

Might new truck drivers someday receive free training as a form of government-subsidized education? Free education in the trades is an idea gaining traction in some circles, alongside national discussions of how to make college affordable for all.

Subsidized blue-collar education would address a number of societal problems, from helping young people find a satisfying career to drawing more people into the trades. We are at a point as a society where many people talk about the trades as though that type of work were only for those incapable of doing much else—the polite way to put it is that “not everyone is cut out for college.” Tell that to somebody whose roof is chipped. Tell that who wants to buy anything ever delivered by a truck. The trades are critically important to society, and funding training programs would be a way to give these skills some respect.

Yet there are problems.

For example, the vast majority of drivers hired in any given year do not last out the year. If the modern trucking industry cannot hang on to the recruits it attracts now, how is generating many new recruits through free training really supposed to help anything?

Making sure this country has a strong pool of talented professional drivers requires several interrelated steps. Subsidizing training programs could indeed make the industry more accessible to low-income people. Carriers also need to work together to improve retention and to continue efforts to open up careers in trucking to women and minorities. Finally, carriers need to continue on the job training, especially safety training.

The Safety Analytics feature in telematics software is an important tool, here. Not only does this feature make it easier for fleet managers to set safety goals for the entire company, it can also function directly as a training tool. Safety Analytics records and compiles instances of unsafe driving, such as speeding, running stop signs, stopping too abruptly, or accelerating too fast. Supervisors can not only identify employees in need of additional training but can also use the recordings to discuss specific events with drivers, asking them why the incidents occurred and going over alternative ways the situation could have been handled.

If America’s professional drivers work more safely, then not only is everyone else on the road safer, so are the professional drivers themselves. A safer work life at least as important as free training towards a successful career.

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Why 1 in 5 Fleet Accidents Occur Off The Road

03/05/2015 by Randy Thomas

Not all accidents happen while drivers are on the road.

In fact, about one in five of all fleet accidents happen in a parking lot, as do 14% of accidents that result in damage. While parking lot collisions between vehicles are seldom dangerous, minor dents and dings still represent money spent and time lost. 

Most parking lot accidents are easily preventable if drivers simply pay attention to their surroundings. For example, before backing up, a driver can get out of the vehicle and take a good look around. If a family with small children is approaching, it might be better to wait, since children might not be visible in mirrors. Beeping the horn a few times before getting going is a good idea, too.

Other parking lot safety tips include choosing parking spaces a little farther away, where the lot is less congested, and opening the windows so as to be able to hear approaching people or vehicles. Whenever possible, a driver should pull forward into the parking space ahead so as to be able to exit without backing up at all. Straight, rather than angled, spaces are easier to enter and exit.

Drivers need to be aware of exactly where their vehicle’s blind spots are and must take the time to check them. If necessary, use a spotter. Being aware of the weather is important, too, because wind can blow an open door right into another vehicle.

More and more vehicles now have rear-view cameras. Fleet vehicles that do not come with cameras can always have them installed, especially in the case of larger trucks that have big blind spots. These cameras do a great job of increasing vehicle safety, but fleets should train drivers not to rely on the cameras alone. Cameras can fail, and even a perfectly functioning camera might not show the driver all possible obstacles. The technology works best as a supplement of traditional good driving practices.

Safety analytics software is a great way to teach and enforce proactive driving practices, such as obeying posted speed limits and stop signs. While telematics obviously cannot record a driver’s attention level directly, it can record enough measures to spot which drivers need further safety training or other intervention. If safety is an important part of overall company culture, drivers will be more receptive to reminders to pay attention in parking lots.

Finally, not all parking lot safety involves moving vehicles. Drivers of fleet vehicles sometimes neglect basic security, like locking doors and parking in populated, well-lit areas wherever possible. It is important for drivers to maintain good security practices at all times, both for the sake of their vehicles and for their own safety.

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The Environmental Impact Of Trucking

03/04/2015 by Shazia Haq

It is no secret that trucking comes with an environmental cost. Modern regulations and newer, more efficient technologies aim to reduce that cost, although more remains to be done. But what exactly is the environmental impact of trucking?  Where do we stand and what is the scale of the problem? 

The most obvious form of pollution from trucking is carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas released by burning fuel. Small quantities of other pollutants, some of which are also greenhouse gasses,are released from the tailpipe as well. Cleaner-burning fuel or better-maintained engines can reduce these other pollutants, but one gallon of diesel fuel always releases just over 22 pounds of carbon dioxide.

America’s trucks travel a total of 93,512,000,000 miles per year—that’s over a thousand times the distance from the earth to the sun. Most trucks get about eight miles per gallon, so that works out to almost 6 million tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Since the United States as a whole has a carbon footprint over a thousand times that (around 6053 million tons) the trucking industry’s contribution does not seem like very much, but trucking can act as a leader within the transportation sector as a whole—and transportation is responsible for almost a third of US carbon dioxide emissions.

Trucking may not technically be the most “enviro friendly” way to ship freight. By almost any measure, carbon emissions, other pollutants, noise, and accidents—rail or water is better. But there are places rail and water simply cannot go. For the foreseeable future, trucking’s market share is only likely to grow. 

Trucking is already shrinking its carbon footprint by progressively improving fuel efficiency. Large truck fleets have the option of shifting to alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, since they can invest in their own new infrastructure—smaller companies and private drivers can then take advantage of the new option. Biodiesel releases almost as much carbon dioxide as traditional diesel fuel does, but because it is made from plant matter, its carbon content came out of the atmosphere recently. Sending that carbon back into the sky does not change the overall balance of atmospheric gasses.

Trucking companies can also work to improve their fuel efficiency by improving routing, driver behavior, and vehicle maintenance.

Fleet management software can help by allowing managers to identify which drivers engage in behavior such as speeding and excessive braking that waste gas. The software collects real-time recordings of such incidents, allowing managers to discuss braking or speeding with the drivers responsible. It is also possible to keep better tabs on the maintenance status of individual vehicles so problems can be fixed as soon as they develop. Better-maintained vehicles burn less gas and run cleaner.

These steps cannot solve climate change on their own, but they still can make a difference.  

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A New Global Telematics Leader...

03/03/2015 by Dennis Jaconi

Global GPS fleet tracking giant, Navman Wireless, has merged with Teletrac, creating one of the world’s largest telematics organizations.

The newly combined company will be overseen by an executive management team selected from both Teletrac and Navman Wireless. TJ Chung, Navman Wireless president, will take the helm as CEO of the joint company. The company will continue to operate under both the Navman Wireless and Teletrac brands and fully support all current subscribers and platforms in its ongoing goal to drive the industry forward.

 “It became clear in our race to being the predominant global GPS fleet and asset tracking solution, that the leverage of combining Navman Wireless and Teletrac was in the clear best interest of both companies’ current and future customers. We realized that both companies were highly synergistic and we had the opportunity to leap forward by partnering strength on strength,” Chung said.

What Does This Mean for the Telematics Industry?

The combined resources of Navman Wireless and Teletrac will expand the company to a more geographically diverse market, with offices across the globe in multiple continents. “We believe more and more companies will want to partner with a global leader that holds a strong track record of customer success,” Chung noted.

The consolidated engineering teams of Navman Wireless and Teletrac will create an industry-leading R&D budget, paving the way for future innovation in the telematics space at a level greater than currently seen in the market. “We expect that both Navman Wireless and Teletrac customers will be able to greatly leverage the enhanced feature set in the coming years as a result of this combination.  Further, our future customers will see the added benefit of leveraging innovations from two leading companies,” noted Mike Jarvinen, VP of Marketing for the joint company.

Focus on Customer Experience

Furthermore, the combined company now represents one of the largest customer support teams in the fleet management industry, where responsive customer service is highly valued. “A commitment by both companies to provide exceptional customer service represents the dedication we have as an organization to our entire customer base, as well as acknowledging the responsibility of maintaining loyal and trustworthy relationships with our clients,” said Orlando Hernandez, Director of Customer Support at Teletrac. 

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