Teletrac.Language Teletrac.NoFollowNoIndex Teletrac.AlternateUrl

Trending News and Stories in the World of GPS Fleet Tracking

Lowering Fleet Costs With Telematics

09/09/2015 by Sarah Barbod

“Low cost” trucks, meaning those priced 15% to 20% lower than standard trucks in the same class, are fast becoming a popular choice for some carriers. The purchase price of vehicles has been climbing quickly in recent years, due in part to new safety and environmental regulations. According to a recent study by global consulting firm Frost and Sullivan, over the next seven years, demand for low cost trucks will rise. While safer and environmentally friendly trucks are a positive evolution of current vehicles, the improved machines cost more and fleets are challenged to cut costs in other areas of their operation to afford the new units.

The discount alternatives follow the regulations but cut corners in other places, such as driver comfort and mechanical longevity as they include smaller engines, powertrains, and none of the interior comforts required by long-haul drivers. As a result, low-cost trucks are unlikely to touch the long-haul market any time soon. But for last mile and local delivery work, vehicles without the interior and mechanical upgrades look increasingly attractive.

The budget problems that modern trucks cause are quite real, but there are solutions that do not involve buying substandard equipment.

Telematics providers, such as Teletrac, give fleet managers tools to help dramatically lower operating costs, such as Safety Analytics to improve driver training and coaching, and maintenance reports that catch unseen service repairs to prevent costly break-downs on the road.

Proactively monitoring vehicle activity can give a fleet manager deep insight into their driver’s behavior. Well trained drivers, who obey speed limits, avoid excessive idling and excessive acceleration, harsh braking, and otherwise practice safe driving, reduce the risk of receiving road violations and fines, and experience fewer accidents. As a result, insurance companies are willing to give fleets that incorporate telematics lower premiums and discounts.

When a business has customers waiting for service, Teletrac’s maintenance feature allows managers to keep track of routine maintenance schedules for their entire fleet to ensure vehicles are in top form, and deliveries are made on time. Managers can also read any fault codes remotely with the vehicle diagnostic report feature so that they can make arrangements for repairs before the vehicle breaks down on the road. Overall, the manager has a more efficient tool to plan ahead so that if a truck ends up in the shop, it is less likely to disrupt fleet operations. Simple problems are more likely to be caught early, reducing maintenance costs and improving engine function to use less fuel.

And less fuel burned means less greenhouse gas emissions.

The purpose of the new Federal regulations is to reduce the carbon footprint of America’s trucking industry and increase safety on our roads. Skilled, careful drivers help make our roads safe and reduce fuel use, thus cutting operating costs and a fleet’s carbon footprint. By incorporating a telematics solution, fleet owners can stay compliant and reduce costs, whether or not they purchase low cost trucks.

Read More

Brake Safety Week 2015

09/03/2015 by Oswaldo Flores

Brake Safety Week is fast approaching. Beginning this Sunday, between September 6 and September 12, Commercial Vehicle Inspectors will make a concerted push to check as many brake systems on commercial vehicles as possible. Most of these will be Level IV inspections, although there will be some Level I inspections and, in some places, tests of vehicle braking efficiency using performance-based brake testing (PBBT) equipment.

Any vehicle found with defective or out-of-alignment brakes will be placed out-of-service.

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) hold the event every year to raise awareness about vehicle brake safety, as well as to enforce rules and regulations throughout North America. Last year, Brake Safety Week saw over thirteen thousand brake inspections. And since its inception in 1998, the program has conducted over 3.4 million inspections, making a conscious effort towards education and enforcement.

And brake problems are disturbingly common. During Roadcheck 2014, almost half of all out-of-service violations involved brakes. The annual unannounced brake inspection event of the same year placed one in six of all trucks inspected out-of-service for brake violations.

For fleet managers, keeping track of maintenance and brake repairs in a large fleet of vehicles can be a challenge. By incorporating a GPS fleet management system, fleet managers can maintain an automated and organized operation. Teletrac offers fleet management software that can help carriers stay ahead of the game, particularly during Brake Safety Week, with two tools:

Maintenance

Teletrac’s Vehicle Maintenance feature empowers fleet managers to proactively plan and track vehicle service. All of the necessary maintenance tasks, from tire rotations and brakes, to oil changes, are easily tracked to plan for future vehicle maintenance, as well as record past services. Particular maintenance due dates per vehicle can be scheduled based on miles, hours and days within service to further organize the users’ experience.   

And paper records have become a thing of the past. With automatic vehicle service reports, fleet managers can view engine data that enables them to know when a vehicle is overdue for service.

Driver Vehicle Inspection Reports (DVIR)

Drivers can be proactive about their vehicle’s repairs, maintenance, and reduction of violations by performing electronic vehicle inspection reports. These reports are federally-mandated, paperless vehicle inspection reports completed on a daily basis. Teletrac’s portable tablet allows drivers the flexibility to walk around their vehicle and complete their inspection. Reports are automatically submitted to fleet managers, right from the in-cab display.

No more forgetting that a vehicle is due for a brake check, or losing inspection records, or incorrectly filling out paperwork. With a GPS fleet management system, vehicle tasks and record keeping is made easy. Carriers can stay compliant and succeed all year round with automated reports and driver inspections.

September 6th is coming up. Are your brakes ready?

For more information, check out Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Programs.

*About the author: Oswaldo Flores is a member of Teletrac's marketing team. He is an expert in product management in the transportation sector for the United States and Mexico.  

Read More

Nearshoring Calls For Shorter Trucking Routes

09/02/2015 by Sarah Barbod

As transportation costs continue to fluctuate, many companies are relocating manufacturing centers closer to home to save money. According to a survey by the global consulting firm AlixPartners, 32% of the 248 senior-level executives in North America and Western Europe say their companies have either nearshored, or are about to do so. In the United States and Canada, the figure rises to 40%. And for the first time the United States, not Mexico, has become the destination of choice.

55% of respondents specifically said they expected relocating to lower their transportation costs. Some expect to save 20% or more on overall operations.

Nearshoring, also known as “reshoring,” is a great opportunity for domestic transportation operators to optimize their operation with shorter routes.

GPS tracking providers offer powerful tools to help fleet managers streamline their operation as production moves closer to customers and trucking activity is increased. Teletrac in particular offers features that help make dispatch more efficient and keep drivers on track as the shift is made to shorter routes:

The Landmark feature allows managers to customize geo-fences for accurate locations, ensuring deliveries are on time. Managers can view their vehicles on a map and identify which unit is designated to a specific location—empowering the user to track and monitor where their fleet goes in real time.

If a customer issues a last minute change to the delivery, or the driver’s destination is suddenly altered, drivers can be notified via their in-cab display of any new navigation and plans with the Send Route feature. No matter where the driver is, they can be automatically guided and informed. The feature proves to be particularly useful when a fleet manager learns of road construction or other obstacles in the driver’s way, and wants to give a driver a new, more efficient route around the problem. A manager can then send a targeted address or landmark via Send Route to a driver. The notification will appear in the driver’s in-cab display and once the driver accepts it, the application plays updated route details.

As manufacturing moves closer to customers, carriers can maximize their routing methods and improve connections between dispatch and drivers by incorporating a GPS tracking solution. The new market demands may fluctuate and customer behavior is always changing. But with the right technology infused in a carrier’s business, instant updated route details and fast response times will improve customer service and operations across the entire business. 

Read More

Improving Driver Retention With Flexible Benefits

08/30/2015 by Oswaldo Flores

Spending time at home has always been an important issue for truck drivers, especially for those with families. The amount of time a driver can spend at home can be the key to whether a driver will stay with a company that values their need, or move on to a different company, or sometimes a different career.

USA Truck, a large for-hire carrier based in Arkansas, is now testing a new program designed to improve drivers’ time off by giving them more flexibility.

The “Choose Your Hometime” program lets drivers choose when and where they take their break. Traditionally, most drivers have had to take their 34-hour restart break wherever they happened to be when they ran up against their weekly limit. If the break happened to begin more than a few hours’ commute from home, the driver would simply be out of luck.

USA Truck’s initiative allows drivers to work with their managers to develop routes that will bring them near home at the time of their break. Those drivers who do not hit the 60-hour limit in a week also have the option to skip their day off and save it for later. Under the new program, there is no limit to the number of days off that can be saved, so that a driver who wants to work every day for a couple of months can save up enough time for a two-week vacation with the family.

The advantage of this program for drivers is clear, but what does USA Truck gain? A more loyal workforce, if the increased flexibility inspires more drivers to stay with the company. Industry-wide, annual turnover is very high, to the point that many carriers must essentially recruit and train an entire new body of drivers every year. Anything that allows a carrier to increase competition for good drivers and retain the talent they already have, is at a definite advantage over other companies.

Finding ways to make work more enjoyable and rewarding for drivers may be the most simple way to cope with the ongoing driver shortage. And reducing turnover can sometimes pay for itself by not spending money on recruiting and training new drivers.

Altering schedules, as USA Truck has done, is just one way for a carrier to make their business more appealing to drivers. By incorporating a GPS tracking solution, better communication and more efficient dispatch, along with a more supportive approach to training, and pay scales based at least in part on driver skill rather than miles alone, are all ways to help keep good people behind the wheel.

Furthermore, with an electronic logging device (ELD) solution, manual logbooks become a thing of the past. Human error is reduced and the recording process for hours-of-service (HOS) is expedited. Data entry is accurate and fast so that carriers can stay compliant and keep their drivers safe. 

There are many ways to keep drivers happy at work. With a GPS tracking solution, retaining drivers and increasing efficiency is made easy. 

*About the author: Oswaldo Flores is a member of Teletrac's marketing team. He is an expert in product management in the transportation sector for the United States and Mexico. 

Read More

A Look Back At Trucking In 2014

08/28/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

2014 was a good year to be in trucking. Virtually every indicator, from driver retention, to profit, to truck sales, increased. The American economy has been growing, increasing market demand and challenging carriers to keep up with the demand for freight.

Commercial Carrier Journal released their Top 250 list for 2014, revealing the top trends and rankings in the trucking industry. With data collected from for-hire trucking companies, taking into account revenues posted by the trucking company, its fleet size, and employment base.

The list announced self-reported revenue was up for the second year in a row, with general freight experiencing the most growth, at 14 percent. Dedicated contract carriage grew at 10.9 percent and the refrigerated segment grew at 10.2 percent.

Many carriers from the CCJ Top 250 list have used the extra funds to invest in new equipment, taking on well over 44,000 new power units in 2014. In comparison, in the previous year, ranked companies barely expanded capacity at all. Most of the growth purchases were Class 8 trucks, giving truck manufacturers their best year since before the recession: 16.7 percent of the purchases were in the flatbed/specialized/heavy haul segment and 10.4 percent were in general freight. The numbers for household goods and the intermodal segments decreased.

Many carriers also invested in new people as hiring and retention surged. The big jump in driver numbers was actually in 2013, with a 2.9 percent increase, but the number of independent contractor drivers and company equipment drivers combined went up in 2014, by 1.2 percent, totaling 723,933 among the 250 top-ranked carriers.

Finally, larger carriers used their new funds to buy each other in a flurry of acquisitions. In some cases, companies bought companies that had themselves just bought other companies. Other carriers succeeded in several acquisitions in the same year, such as Forward Air Corp. who purchased Central States Trucking Co., Central States Logistics, and Towne Air Freight. These acquisitions not only allow a company to diversify its business or rapidly increase its size, but the practice is also an effective way to eliminate the competition.

While changes in fuel prices are difficult to predict, there is no reason to believe they are about to rise in the next few months. Consumer demand should remain strong for the immediate future, keeping shipping prices relatively high.

With such business-friendly circumstances, we can expect 2015 to finish out as a positive year in trucking as well.

Read More

A Safe Place to Rest: Secure Parking for Truckers

08/27/2015 by Sarah Barbod

The lack of secure parking spots for truckers is no secret in the industry. In fact, many argue the driver shortage problem is caused in part by drivers leaving the industry because of the added stress of finding a place to rest at night, in addition to focusing on operating safely.

Jason Rivenburg was a truck driver who was attacked and murdered by robbers in 2009 when he parked his truck in an unsafe area.

Since her husband’s death, Hope Rivenburg has become a dedicated advocate for safe parking areas for truckers. She was instrumental in getting a provision, known as Jason’s Law, into the 2012 MAP-12 highway bill.

Jason’s Law required the Department of Transportation (DOT) to conduct a national study on parking availability. The recent results of the DOT’s study reveal only 12 states have adequate safe parking for truck drivers. In all others, truckers have to take their chances. Many resort to freeway ramps, abandoned gas stations, or industrial parking lots.

The DOT has also created the National Coalition on Truck Parking and charged the new body with finding both short- and long-term solutions to the parking shortage. The coalition has a long list of member organizations, including: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials; American Trucking Associations; Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance; Federal Highway Administration; Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration; National Association of Truck Stop Operators; and Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association. Other interested parties, such as trucking organizations and state transportation departments, are also invited to participate.

As the coalition works to build more truck stops, they must also discover how many are necessary, where they should be placed, and, most importantly, how to pay for them. A big part of the problem has been the ongoing issues with the Highway Trust Fund. Since Congress has only been passing short-term extensions to the Fund, states have been unable to commit to any kind of long-term infrastructure projects, making budgeting a challenge with so much financial uncertainty.

The creation of the coalition is certainly good news, but until it completes its initiative, drivers must still cope with a dangerous lack of safe places to rest. In the meantime, fleet managers can help drivers plan ahead and efficiently navigate their journey by incorporating a GPS tracking solution into their fleet operations.

Teletrac’s Landmarks feature allows fleet managers to focus on selected points of interest, including safe places to rest and park. The selected landmark can be assigned to specific drivers, where it appears on their in-cab display, allowing them to easily route and navigate to their safe parking spot.

As the National Coalition on Truck Parking and Jason Rivenburg’s widow continue to advocate and build safe parking areas for drivers, fleet managers can do the same and maintain the safety of their drivers with some help from GPS tracking software.

Read More

Are “Piggyback” Trailers The Answer To Driver Shortage?

08/20/2015 by Sarah Barbod

Since the middle of 2010, the driver shortage crisis has been an ongoing problem in the trucking industry.

Although the industry has increased its workforce dramatically in the last two years, America is still short by well over 100,000 drivers. To combat the shortage, some carriers are planning new methods to meet demand and make deliveries on time. According to the recent survey Fleet Sentiment Report by CK Commercial Vehicle Research, roughly 70% of trucking companies’ surveyed plan to buy extra trailers to expand capacity. 

By attaching an additional trailer, truckers can “piggyback” on an existing tractor. The logic behind this is to allow carriers to keep the same number of tractors and the same number of drivers, yet increase productivity. This practice is not permitted in all states. However, the idea is gaining popularity. When a driver drops off a load, the next load is waiting in the second attached trailer.

The amount of money carriers can save upon changing the tractor to trailer ratio is debatable. Piggybacking trailers adds more weight, making the engine work harder and burn more fuel. The added weight can also increase wear and tear on the tractor, thus increasing maintenance costs. Yet, these projected added costs can be much less than fueling and maintaining two separate tractors.

If this added trailer plan materializes, keeping track of assets can become a challenge. Many carriers lose a great deal of money to wasted fuel, wasted time, theft, high maintenance fees, and insurance premiums.

By investing in a GPS tracking solution, carriers can be prepared to track their assets and keep costs down. With a complete solution that incorporates reporting features and comprehensive data analysis tools, reducing excessive idling and other behaviors that either waste fuel, risk accidents, or cause other costly repairs, can be tracked and prevented.

Additionally, carriers can reduce liability risk and costly insurance premiums with a GPS tracking risk management tool that offers visibility over unauthorized vehicle use and driver safety. This oversight opens opportunity to use driver scorecarding to implement safety and rewards programs to help retain drivers. Instant replay of safety events as they happen in real-time are also effective for improving training and driver coaching.

With efficient fleet management tools and comprehensive data analysis features, carriers can increase the productivity of their fleet and maintain a positive team of drivers, regardless of the number of trailers they own. 

Read More

Driving While Under The Sleep Influence

08/20/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

A Federal investigation has confirmed what many had already predicted—the multi-vehicle accident involving 21 people that killed comedian James McNair, and seriously injured actor/comedian Tracy Morgan in 2014 was caused by a dangerously fatigued driver. The man driving the Walmart truck that triggered the accident was not only nearing the end of his 14-hour shift, but he had completed an 800-mile commute to get to work the day before. As a result, he had been awake at the time of the accident for over 28 hours.

Hours of service (HOS) regulations exist to maintain a manageable and healthy working schedule for drivers with appropriate rest hours, in part, to keep exhausted drivers off the road and prevent dangerous driving habits. However, the primary issue in the Walmart case was the driver’s behavior before he got behind the wheel of the truck for work. HOS rules cannot oversee what drivers do when off-duty.

This tragic and very public accident has spurred serious discussion at a national level about driver fatigue. It has influenced carriers to better train and coach their drivers about health and safety.

There are measures carriers can take to ensure drivers do not become fatigued while working and that they are fit to work at the beginning of their shift. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has recommended that the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) finish its work evaluating fatigue-monitoring technologies and other integrated onboard safety systems. Carriers can also educate their drivers on the importance of adequate rest.

Furthermore, individual carriers can incorporate GPS tracking software to help foster a culture of safety among their drivers. Teletrac’s Safety Analytics feature makes it easy to identify which drivers are consistently practicing safe driving habits, and which drivers need additional training. The combination of focused training where needed and recognition for those who do well gives drivers a reason to prioritize safety in their work. The ability to record the details of problematic events not only makes a great training tool, it also gives fleet managers insight into their driver’s behavior on an individual basis. By drilling down to specific metrics, fleet managers can identify which drivers need additional training, or disciplinary action.    

Chronic fatigue can also cause serious health concerns for drivers, especially since driving long distances can be a physically demanding exercise all by itself. While carriers cannot oversee their employees during their hours off-duty, they can educate their drivers on how to take better care of themselves and identify signals of tired behavior before they get on the road. By preventing fatigued drivers from getting behind the wheel, our roads can be more safe for both the driver and the general public.

Read More

The New Data Analytic Fleet Manager

08/14/2015 by Shelley Lynch

The role of the fleet manager has evolved tremendously over the years. With the introduction of GPS tracking software, fleet managers have become more data driven and analytical.  

Traditionally, a fleet manager’s profile has been that of an ex-mechanic, someone who worked in a shop and has extensive knowledge of vehicles and their equipment, along with the people management skills acquired from experience working in a machinist culture and environment. For a traditional fleet manager, most decisions were made intuitively, based on the manager’s personal experience with both vehicles and drivers. 

GPS tracking software stands to change the traditional role of fleet managers. The new applicant pool fleet businesses are considering involve candidates with knowledge and experience in data analytics and Information Technology (IT). The “people skills” associated with a conventional fleet manager has moved to the human resources department.

The new art and science of fleet management rests on filtering through data to decide which metrics to use to make business decision.

Capturing fleet data is available with a comprehensible GPS tracking solution. With the right fleet manager, more objective financial decisions can be made to save the company time and money. Custom reports enable fleet managers to analyze each vehicle’s fuel consumption, resale value, and maintenance data, in addition to the current and projected prices of fuel, to determine if replacing particular vehicles in a fleet with more fuel-efficient models could have a positive effect on the company’s bottom line. This business intelligence from a GPS tracking solution enables users to analyze, sort, filter and manipulate fleet data such as driver work hours and idle time into helpful measurements, allowing users to cut down on unnecessary vehicle use, fuel waste, and repair costs.

More importantly, as GPS tracking technology evolves and fleets continue to aggregate data, the new fleet manager needs to understand the customer and align the data with the customer’s needs. Today, customers expect to know exactly when their delivery is arriving. If they call the office for an update, fleet managers must communicate the status of the delivery in real-time.

The industry as a whole is experiencing a shift away from the traditional fleet manager towards an analytical, IT savvy fleet manager who can filter through large amounts of data and interpret the metrics to make smart businesses decisions. And sure, human resources can solve the personnel issues. But the individual making decisions about the trucks must still remember there are people inside of them.

As technology in the transportation industry evolves, so do fleet managers. By widening the pool of opportunity to candidates normally not associated with the role, fleets can maintain a competitive advantage. 

*About the author- Shelley Lynch is Teletrac’s Vice President of Emerging and International Markets. She is an expert in fleet tracking requirements in the government sector. 

Read More

Are Smart Fleets Finding Their Place On Our Roads?

08/13/2015 by Sid Nair

As technology evolves, our vehicles continue to adapt along with the latest advances in electronics, transforming the transportation landscape into a smarter, more connected environment.

Currently, there are two evolutions of technological integrations happening in the automotive industry, and they take the form of autonomous vehicles, versus smarter designed vehicles.

The autonomous, self-driving vehicle is not a completely new concept. Some of its conceptual elements, such as cruise control, have been in function for decades. And the latest prototypes from Google and QNX have features that sense the outside environment and navigate the vehicle without human input. However, these vehicles are a long way from hitting the mainstream as government policy, insurance and practical requirements of the vehicle cloud its fast market spread.

Smarter vehicles, on the other hand, use available technology from smartphones and popular apps to make driving easier and more enjoyable. By integrating our everyday gadgets into our cars, vehicles are better connected and sophisticated with advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS). Many smart vehicles already offer ADAS features such as lane drifting warnings to maintain safety, collision detection systems to protect against momentary lapses in human awareness, and 360-degree camera views to check for blind spots.   

For businesses with a fleet of vehicles, there is GPS tracking software that converts numerous vehicles into “smart” machines, empowering fleets to be efficient, safe and productive. The software is versatile and enables even the most low-tech units to be upgraded with the latest high-tech capabilities.

Lane guidance and navigation tools are available with an advanced GPS tracking system that incorporates maps and turn-by-turn, voice guided routing that helps drivers stay in their lane, stay on track and on time. With a variety of map views, this feature can help drivers see where they are going while considering speed limits and road restrictions including, road conditions and weight and height guidelines.

Safety tools are much more advanced with a GPS tracking solution. Collision avoidance features are offered in mainstream smart cars. Whereas safety analytics system in GPS tracking software offers metrics into driver behavior, monitoring and recording in real-time driver habits such as speeding, stop sign violations, and even harsh braking. With this information, fleet managers can better train and coach their drivers to improve their performance, and keep the roads safe.

Whether operating a fleet of vehicles, or single passenger cars, by incorporating the latest technology in your units, vehicles can be transformed into smarter, safer, more connected machines than ever before. 

*About the author: Sid Nair is a member of Teletrac's marketing team. He is the Senior Director of Marketing and Product Management, and serves as an expert in GPS tracking software and hardware for the transportation sector around the globe.

Read More

Fostering A Culture Of Teamwork With GPS Tracking Software

08/12/2015 by Sarah Barbod

Culture- it’s the current buzzing word in business. In fact, Merriam Webster Dictionary named culture as the Most Popular Word of 2014. And according to a recent Deloitte study, 88% of employees and 94% of executives think a “distinct workplace culture is important to business”.

So, what is a workplace culture? And how can a business with a fleet of vehicles optimize their company culture with a GPS tracking solution?

An organization’s culture is a set of collective values, beliefs, and ethics particular to a company. There are numerous factors that contribute to this collective, including language, symbols, and systems. As a whole, culture is an important dimension of business practice as it helps employees align their work processes with the company, and build a unified sense of positivity and productivity in the workplace.  

GPS tracking software is a tool to help fleet owners build collaboration among drivers, fleet managers, and other business associates to cultivate a company culture based in cooperation, collaboration, and teamwork—the kind of culture that can support long-term business success.

There are numerous GPS tracking solutions that offer various tools to help accomplish this. Teletrac provides solutions that optimize fleet operations and lay the foundation for successful fleet culture. With high driver shortage looming across the industry, Teletrac’s Fleet Director platform offers in-depth fleet data that monitors business inefficiencies, including fuel waste, idle time, driver safety scores, and reports. The cumulative data empowers fleet managers to evaluate costs and collaborate with drivers to create incentives—such as bonuses or gift cards—to help retain drivers and create an atmosphere of efficiency and high-value customer service.

Teletrac’s Safety Analytics Event Viewer replays unsafe driving events including speeding, harsh braking, and stop sign violations. By monitoring driver habits, fleet managers can detect who is practicing safety, and who is not. This data opens the door to driver training and coaching. Not only can accidents be reduced, but coaching and training programs entrust drivers with a greater feeling of control. It emphasizes the fact that employees and management have the same goal—the safety and success of the driver—and fosters a workplace culture that treats the entire company as a team.

The metrics and data collected in a GPS tracking solution can be filtered through to drive change and improve safety across an entire fleet. This collaborative practice between fleet managers and drivers enables a positive company culture based in teamwork, optimizing business success for the long-term.

Read More

Beer- The New Biofuel To Power Your Fleet?

08/07/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

For years, researchers have been investigating the waste products of brewing as feedstock for biofuel production. Now, a New Zealand company, DB Export, has actually done it—made and sold a test batch of fuel made from the solids left over after beer production. They call it “Brewtroleum”, and the fuel is popular enough that DB Export is considering making another batch.

Catchy name aside, Brewtroleum has possibilities as an alternative fuel.

What the New Zealand company makes from brewing waste is ethanol, the form of alcohol often produced from corn in the United States. The Brewtroleum mixture is most likely a combination of ethanol and gasoline (since vehicles built to run on gas cannot use pure ethanol). These mixes are not new—here in the United States, we’ve been using gas and ethanol mixtures for years, ostensibly as a way to reduce reliance on foreign oil. The standard mixtures are E10 and E15, or ten and fifteen percent ethanol, respectively.

The only new thing about Brewtroleum is what it’s made from.

Ethanol is marketed as a “green” fuel, and indeed it does produce marginally fewer emissions. More importantly, it isn’t a fossil fuel, so in theory, using it should reduce our carbon footprint. Yet burning ethanol still releases carbon dioxide, but because that carbon was only recently sequestered, releasing it back into the atmosphere does not significantly change the Earth’s carbon balance. The problem is that here in the United States, we produce our ethanol from corn. Growing, transporting, and processing that corn requires a lot of fossil fuel—by some estimates, the total carbon footprint of corn-based ethanol is actually higher than that of gasoline.

Brewtroleum could change that. Because it is made from a waste product from another industry, most of its carbon footprint actually belongs to the beer. The biofuel is a freebie.      

Unfortunately, ethanol, from whatever source, is hard on engines, especially those of earlier vehicles that were designed to run on gas alone. Gas and ethanol mixtures also sometimes separate, rendering the whole tank of fuel suddenly useless. Brewtroleum can’t change either of these facts. What it can do is make ethanol become the greener alternative that it’s claimed to be.

For businesses with a fleet a vehicles, reducing fuel waste and lowering the company’s carbon footprint is key. Fleet managers can be empowered with a GPS tracking solution that provides advanced tools to reduce carbon emissions and promote an environmentally friendly fleet of vehicles.  

With a GPS tracking solution that incorporates reporting features, unnecessary miles, idling, and speeding are cut out of the fleet’s operation, and ultimately less fuel is burned.

If we change the fuels we use and cut out unnecessary fuel use, the carbon footprint of fleets can be improved across the globe.

Read More
Request a Free Live Demo

Let one of our specialists take you through the main features with a live web demo.

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*
My drivers require Hours of Service logs.
Free Quick Quote

Get a no obligation quote and find out how much you could save!

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*
My drivers require Hours of Service logs.
Download our Brochure

Get full details of Fleet Director's features and much more...

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*
Access Free Tools

Get instant access to this and all other free tools for fleet owners and managers.

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*
My drivers require Hours of Service logs.
Resource Download

Get instant access to this and all other free tools for fleet owners and managers.

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*
Speak to a Compliance Expert Now!

Teletrac is leading the way in ELD solutions and we're here to help! Fill out the form below and a compliance expert will reach out in just minutes.

First Name:*
Last Name:*
Company:*
Fleet Size:*
Email:*
Telephone:*
Country:*