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Avoiding “Big Brother” Fears In A Fleet

10/02/2015 by Sarah Barbod

GPS tracking is great for fleet management. Knowing exactly where all vehicles are at all times is a big boost to security. Good data analysis can flag inefficient or dangerous drivers. Generally, when drivers know they are being watched, they do a better job.

But that doesn’t mean drivers like, nor feel comfortable, being monitored.

In 1949, George Orwell’s dystopian novel, Nineteen Eighty-four, introduced the image of “Big Brother”—a shadowy, authoritarian figure who uses constant electronic surveillance to maintain absolute political control. Modern technology now makes such surveillance easy to capture. And for professional drivers working for an organization with a fleet of vehicles that incorporates a telematics system, fears of “Big Brother” may naturally occur. It is the responsibility of fleet managers to address and resolve those fears through a genuine respect for privacy, good communication, and clarifying the benefits of GPS tracking with drivers.

Privacy

The best way to reassure drivers that they don’t work for Big Brother is to respect driver privacy. Clearly communicate the company policy regarding the GPS tracking system in the business as a smart tool to measure efficiency, and to help drivers be more productive. Furthermore, using company assets in the best interest of the business is key to ensuring employees are accountable for their actions. With GPS tracking software, fleet owners can share with drivers information regarding their areas of improvement, allowing drivers to make the most out of their daily tasks. Privacy is a sensitive subject. Being honest and open about maximizing the fleet’s resources with smart tools such as GPS tracking can enhance a driver’s work, rather than invade their privacy.

Communication

When employees are ill-informed about new integrations in the company’s business, it can be easy to quickly jump to conclusions. Introducing a new GPS tracking system does not need to be difficult. Fleet managers can ensure to clearly communicate what information is being collected by the system, how the vehicles are monitored, and why. Sharing reports generated by the system with drivers and other employees conveys transparency and honesty. It further opens understanding of the system’s purpose in the company and how the business is improving. Keep communication channels clear by responding to questions and concerns promptly.

Driver Benefits

Finally, it’s important to make clear that GPS tracking is not all about the business. The system actually works to a driver’s advantage when there are recordings of driver activity in the event of an accident, medical emergency, or crime. Fleet managers can use the data to support drivers if they are accused of wrongdoing by customers or an insurance company. Additionally, the system can be used to offer incentives including higher base pay, recognition, or bonuses to the best performing drivers.

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The Deep Business Data of ELDs

10/02/2015 by Parth Raval

The approaching electronic logging device (ELD) mandate has generated a large amount of buzz in the transportation industry. Most of the conversation revolves around the short-term impact of the mandate – how to pick an ELD, what it takes to install the devices, and how to train drivers in their use. Perhaps even more important than this is the mandate’s long-term impact. ELDs put a great deal of data at a business’ fingertips. The data generated from ELDs can be applied to matters beyond federal compliance. Businesses need to know how to use this information in a smart and effective fashion if they want to take full advantage of ELDs.

ELDs put driver workhour information in a digital format. Once that information is recorded, businesses can analyze that data to determine which drivers routinely risk violating Hours of Service (HOS) compliance and other federal regulations In addition, companies can use ELD data to generate reports concerning employee use of time, job completion and route scheduling.

This is the long-term effect ELDs can have on businesses – a portal to better, stronger data regarding driver behavior. With ELDs installed in vehicles, fleet managers have access to an unvarnished account of how drivers spend their hours. This in turn can lead to more efficient deliveries, more satisfied customers and a more smoothly run business. 

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The Challenge Commercial Vehicle Drivers Face Over Parking

09/25/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) recently released the results of their survey on parking for the trucking industry. Generally, drivers want a reserved parking system in safe locations. Yet drivers are not willing to pay for the reserved areas themselves. In fact, of the 1,417 commercial drivers surveyed, almost half actually refused to pay for parking.

According to the ATRI, employee drivers singled out their carrier to pay for parking. And the results of the survey present the strong argument from professional drivers against paying themselves, since it is a state budget issue to open parking capacity to fit driver needs.

An added complication is that changes in both supply chain structures and in the trucking industry itself mean that truckers now need parking spots in new and different places. Replacing lost parking and expanding existing parking isn’t necessarily the answer. The survey addressed this issue as well, soliciting feedback on where truckers want to be able to park. With 52% of for-hire drivers and 39% of fleet drivers said they want reserved parking around major metropolitan areas. Smaller numbers of both groups, 26% and 32%, respectively, simply want reserved parking everywhere.

The issue is not just finding an open spot to park a truck. As things stand, the shortage of safe parking places often forces drivers to take their rest breaks on the side of the road or in other unsafe areas where they are vulnerable to theft, and sometimes violence as demonstrated with the 2009 death of trucker, Jason Rivenburg.

Part of the reason why the United States trucking industry has a critical shortage of drivers is that commercial driving is a demanding, at times difficult and dangerous job. And while carriers can improve their recruitment methods and increase driver compensation, as long as working as a trucker carries an elevated risk of unsafe work-related issues, the appeal of these careers will be limited.

For the time being, carriers can help their employees stay safe by using GPS tracking solutions to help them locate existing safe parking areas with selected points of interest in the tracking system. The selected areas can be assigned to specific drivers, where the selection appears on the drivers’ in-cab display, allowing them to easily route and navigate to their safe parking spot.

With the collaboration of drivers, carriers and customers, safe and effective parking areas can be developed to meet everyone’s needs.

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How Risky Is Professional Driving?

09/25/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Last year, roughly 4,679 people died in the United States due to work injuries, with 725 of those people being truck drivers. The number of fatal work related injuries in the trucking occupation hit the highest total, more than other occupations, since 2008.

These numbers are preliminary. They come from the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI), which is conducted every year by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The numbers will not be finalized until after the spring of 2016.

Putting these figures into context, “driver/sales workers” were also included in the “truck driver” category, adding 100 deaths in 2014 to the category. The injury rate for driver/sales workers and truck drivers was 23.4 per 100,000 full time-equivalent workers. That’s still more than seven times the national overall rate of 3.3, but it’s nowhere near the top of the list. The top rates belong to the fishing industry, with 80.8 deaths per 100,000, and logging, with a whopping 109.5 fatal injury rate.

Driving a heavy-duty and tractor-trailer vehicle can be dangerous. In proportion to other occupations, the fatal work related injury is slim in the very large transportation industry. Nonetheless, minor safety improvements could drastically save many lives.

A ten percent reduction in mortality among fishers would save two people. That’s important. But the same ten percent reduction for heavy-duty truck drivers saves more than 70 lives. And that’s not counting non-professional drivers who might otherwise be caught up in collisions with trucks.

Significant reductions in trucker mortality are certainly possible, since a lot of fatal injuries occur as a result of speeding, distracted drivers, or fatigued driving behavior—things we already know drivers should not be doing. The problem is that many carriers still unintentionally incentivize speeding and over-work by paying drivers strictly by the mile. Going faster and driving longer both pack more miles and hence more money, into one day.

With GPS tracking software, it’s possible to reward drivers for their attention and safe driving skills instead.

Teletrac’s Safety Analytics feature makes it possible to not only see where each driver is, but to identify which driver most often engages in unsafe behaviors such as speeding or erratic driving. Managers can see which drivers need extra training or even disciplinary action. And which drivers deserve rewards for their safe driving skills. The drivers who practice safe driving can then get a higher per-mile rate.

With the right GPS tracking software, the number of fatal work related injuries in trucking can potentially be lowered so that carriers can improve safety across their entire fleet. 

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ELDs Can Recover Your Lost Hours

09/25/2015 by Parth Raval

The heart of fleet management is efficiency. Untimely delivery schedules can result in unhappy customers, dissatisfied drivers and lost revenue – if your business can identify places where time is lost, measures can be taken to circumvent those issues.

For drivers, a significant amount of time can be devoted to compliance. Federal compliance rules can be complex and take a good deal of energy to properly satisfy.  Completing Hours of Service (HOS) logs in particular occupy a good chunk of the workday. Traditional logs entail lengthy paperwork, lost driving time, and allocating funds to faxing and storage. Electronic logging devices (ELDs), which the federal government is set to mandate on October 30th, significantly cut down on the amount of time a driver needs to spend properly completing HOS logs. By electronically storing all logs, companies can stay safely compliant at a fraction of the risk associated with paper logs. These risks include incorrectly entering information, improperly sending and storing the logs, and being found in federal violation.

Of course, the introduction of new technology can be daunting. Change can be hard and companies may be hesitant to install a new system. Teletrac’s ELD system has been described as simple to use, essential and hassle-free by some of the most trusted names on the road. The system combines HOS and driver vehicle inspection reports (DVIRs) to create an easy compliance tool drivers and managers can quickly access. With a full integration with Teletrac’s Fleet Director platform, this ELD option gives businesses a complete view of their fleet. ELD experts at Teletrac are ready to walk you through the FMCSA mandate to see if Teletrac’s system is right for you. 

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How Technology Is Influencing FMCSA Compliance

09/23/2015 by Sid Nair

New technology is continuing to transform the trucking industry. From collision mitigation, to autonomous vehicles, the transportation landscape is undergoing a transformation in safety awareness and data collection. According to panel discussions at this year’s Commercial Vehicle Outlook Conference in Dallas, Texas, safety technologies such as telematics systems are becoming prominent fixtures in commercial vehicles.

Moreover, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has further developed the industry’s safety standards by mandating the use of electronic logging devices (ELDs) in order for fleets to stay federally compliant within Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations.

Telematics provider Teletrac has been helping carriers save on costly violations, calm safety concerns and help companies strengthen their competitive edge with an hours-of-service (HOS) solution. The solution offers a wealth of data, improved communication, and an easy integration with other Fleet Director components. It also offers an ELD feature that has been helping carriers eliminate paper forms and submissions for an easy, safe and hassle-free process. Although the publication of the ELD mandate from the Department of Transportation (DOT) has been pushed back to October 30th of this year, some businesses have already adopted the technology in their fleet in preparation for the two years following the final rule. Check out what they have to say here about their ELD experience.

Teletrac also offers data analysis packages that further help fleets stay compliant. Teletrac’s Driver Safety Analytics feature collects information on how well drivers actually drive—recording events such as speeding, harsh braking, and stop sign violations. The fleet manager can then easily view which drivers are the most safety-conscious, and which drivers are most prone to problems. The information can be used to plan additional driver training and offer incentives for improved performance. The result is a safer, more conscientious driver pool.

Even after the FMCSA publishes its Final Rule next month, carriers will have two years to comply. As useful as telematics systems are, those that incorporate federally compliant features is key to substantially expanding a business’ reach. With more information gathered from ELDs and Driver Safety Analytics, carriers can experience improved driver performance, which in turn allows room for less wear and tear on vehicles, a reduction in fuel consumption, and a dramatic reduction in accident-related costs.

We could be looking at a world where motor vehicle accidents are largely a thing of the past.

*About the author: Sid Nair is a member of Teletrac's marketing team. He is the Senior Director of Marketing and Product Management, and serves as an expert in GPS tracking software and hardware for the transportation sector around the globe. 

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How Tracking Government Vehicles Can Save States Money

09/18/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Louisiana has had a budget problem for a while now, and it’s getting worse as the state legislature further restricts the finances of some state government departments. But problems have solutions. Five years ago the states’ Agriculture Department moved to cut expenses by right-sizing its fleet, reducing personal use of department vehicles, and investing in a GPS solution to minimize fuel waste. In the first year alone, the fleet reduced its fuel consumption by 15 percent, saving $1 million. This savings alone is an important reduction in greenhouse gas emissions as well, which proves to be especially influential in a low-lying state like Louisiana where climate change and rising sea levels threaten the state.

Louisiana’s Alcohol and Tobacco Commission then adopted the same program and got very similar cost savings. Now, the state as a whole is following suit by adopting a centralized GPS tracking system for all state government vehicles.

State officials estimate that the system will pay for itself three times over in the next five years.

GPS tracking systems save fleets money by drawing attention to driver behavior. Speeding, harsh acceleration and braking, and excessive idling, all waste fuel. When these actions occur, the GPS tracking system can send an alert to the fleet manager immediately notifying him, or her, when a driver is engaged in these behaviors.

There are numerous GPS tracking systems that provide various tools. Teletrac offers a Driver Safety Analytics feature that detects poor driving habits, recording instances of wasteful or unsafe driving that identifies which drivers have persistent bad habits. With this information, fleet managers can direct additional training or disciplinary measures to drivers who need help. Or provide recognition and rewards to drivers who have been performing well.

GPS tracking solutions at their core serve as navigation tools to help improve efficiency for both fuel and time. With Teletrac, an open line of communication with drivers and dispatch is seamless with Two-Way Messaging. The tool serves as a helpful device to send key customer information or updated routes to drivers.

GPS-based fleet-management systems are not new, but Louisiana’s centralized system, which follows the recommendation of an efficiency study commissioned by the governor, is unusual. Normally, each government agency manages its fleet separately. A combined system has the advantage of allowing agencies to share both resources and data, reducing redundancy and further reducing fuel consumption—and ultimately lowering insurance premiums. Other states may soon get in on the act.

Teletrac already helps over 22,000 customers with GPS tracking and fleet management. With features from Safety Analytics, to Two-Way Messaging, fleets cut waste, and financially strapped states do a better job of serving their residents.

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How ELDs Can Help Your Company

09/18/2015 by Parth Raval

With the federal electronic logging device (ELD) mandate on its way, chatter surrounding the law has erupted. Many companies are wondering if the ELD mandate will apply to them, while others ask what the benefits of ELDs are. Businesses that use ELDs have a clear advantage over their competitors, with improved federal compliance records and greater insight into vehicle statuses. The best ELDs go beyond federal compliance to give managers a comprehensive view of what happens on the road.

Improve Compliance, Productivity and Safety

ELDs provide drivers with an efficient way to enter hours of service (HOS) information. With paper logs, drivers have to fill in their logs by hand and fax them once they reach a fuel stop – a time-consuming, pricey, and outdated process that companies don’t need. With ELDs, drivers can instantly send digital reports from their in-cab device, saving time and staying compliant.

Save Time on Repairs and Maintenance

Sidelining a vehicle due to unforeseen maintenance or repairs is a costly decision. Driver vehicle inspection reports for pre- and post-trip inspections mitigate this risk. It is wise to track vehicle inefficiencies and needs so that they can be quickly attended to, keeping the fleet strong and on the road year-round.

Reduce Carbon Footprint

ELDs are paperless, helping companies reduce their reliance on physical resources. Companies can save a great deal as a result of their reduction in paperwork. On top of saving money, companies can reduce the risk of a costly federal audit with reliable HOS data.

Boost Driver and Dispatch Communication

Advanced ELDs include a slew of driver apps, including two-way communication, as well as federally compliant electronic log books and driver vehicle inspection reports. These devices can issue break-time alerts, send arrival and departure times, and allow drivers to ask for help without using a mobile phone or leaving their vehicle.

Visibility into Vehicle Activity and Driver Safety

An ELD that integrates with a cloud-based fleet management system goes beyond tracking HOS status changes. These fleet management systems include GPS fleet tracking features, such as real-time access to vehicle locations on a live, interactive map, ensuring managers can always remain in touch with their drivers. In addition, businesses can use dashboards, reports and business intelligence data to see what matters most to the company.

The ELD mandate gives companies an opportunity to dive deeply into their fleets’ operations and retrieve data that can reveal previously unknown inefficiencies.  The right ELD system can provide the framework for a stronger, better business. 

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Telematics- Balancing Work And Quality Of Life Over The Road

09/17/2015 by Sarah Barbod

Driving a truck can be lonely, and at times stressful, especially for drivers who have routes that take them away from home for weeks or even months at a time. For over the road and long haul drivers, the truck cab becomes a kind of home, a small space filled with a bed, make shift kitchen, and touching mementos of home. Vice.com recently published a photo series showcasing the lives of truck drivers with displays of their in-cab sleeper berths that include keepsakes from their homes, such as a picture colored by a drivers’ granddaughter, photos of loved ones, and religious items adorning the walls. Some drivers only really need to leave the truck for restroom breaks, to buy groceries, or eat out at a restaurant. But living in the small, cramped, and sometimes isolated, in-cab space can take its toll over time.

Truckers must cope with the physical challenges of their job that involves being on the road for long periods of time and maintaining a seated position for their work day. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) revealed the high rates of obesity among long-haul truck drivers and all of the added health issues associated with the disease.

It is no surprise that annual driver turnover for some carriers is approaching 100%. In addition to challenging health, work, and travel conditions, drivers experience concerns over pay scales, benefits, and work-related stress. 

Carriers can do several things to make their drivers’ jobs easier and more rewarding. Beginning with salary, carriers can improve their competitive advantage either by increasing base pay or by offering financial incentives for safe and efficient driving. Just as important, carriers can use available technology to address the specific stressors that bother truckers on the road. For example, GPS navigation and routing helps drivers stay on route and even avoid traffic congestion. Telematics systems improve communication with dispatch and lets drivers call ahead if they have to stop somewhere due to weather or unsafe road conditions.

Perhaps most importantly, carriers can ensure that drivers get the rest they need and that their schedules give them as much home time as possible. Hours-of-Service (HOS) regulations are designed specifically to protect drivers from over-work and fatigued driving. HOS solutions within telematics services ensure that drivers remain compliant and well-rested.

Better working conditions will certainly help improve the quality of life for drivers while they are on the road. And with an integrated HOS solution in the trucks’ telematics system, drivers can work a healthy schedule that can prevent fatigued and dangerous driving. By utilizing a telematics system, overall improved communication, route efficiency, safe driving behavior, and HOS compliance translates to a healthier support system for a drivers’ career and personal life.

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How A Small Trucking Carrier Saved Money On Repairs

09/11/2015 by Sarah Barbod

Leonard Payne & Son Trucking Company is a small, family-owned corporation based in Bakersfield, California. They specialize in hauling heavy, oversized equipment for farming, construction, and other applications. After 60 years in business, the company decided to incorporate Teletrac’s GPS Tracking Solution, Fleet Director. And Vice President William Payne couldn’t be happier.

Payne unequivocally cites help with tracking and maintenance as the most valuable dimension of Teletrac’s service as he experienced immediate savings:

Your equipment picked up two codes in the ECM (Engine Control Module) causing problems with [a particular] truck that we have been trying to fix for two months,” said Payne. Fleet Director even helped the company find and fix problems they didn’t know they were experiencing, “We also found out the reasoning behind [an additional] trucks' after filter burn off issues. Teletrac has already paid for itself, and it’s only been a week!” exclaimed Payne. Not only do repairing small maintenance issues improve fuel mileage, it also makes the repair of larger mechanical problems much easier.

Payne can get data on his vehicles if their routes take them into coverage gaps. The codes saved from the ECM were tracked by Teletrac's Prism TM470, an advanced GPS device that automatically saves information such as vehicle speed, direction and ignition on/off status as needed and then transmits the data to Fleet Director when the vehicle returns to a coverage area.

With the ability to detect and record problematic issues in his vehicles, Payne considers maintenance one of the most important factors in running an efficient fleet. He states, “If your trucks aren’t going all of the time, you’re losing money.” While some might be tempted to try to cut costs by delaying maintenance, that only increases the chance that a vehicle will break down on the road, which can turn into an extremely expensive proposition.

“The more you know about your vehicle,” says Payne, “from [getting insight into] what it is doing, to the problems that may arise—if you can get them fixed earlier, then you’re going to have a [more efficient fleet] in the future.”

Additionally, California’s new environmental regulations mean that Leonard Payne & Son Trucking will have to take some of their older vehicles off the road in a few months. Being able to get the bugs out of the newer trucks ahead of time is going to be key to the company’s ability to offer uninterrupted service. Without a GPS tracking solution, detecting faults were difficult, “Before I would have to wait for those problems to arise and fix them. And by that time I’ve already lost thousands of dollars on my trucks sitting on the road,” said Payne.

But thanks to Teletrac, Payne can save time and money, “Now I am able to find out what is wrong with my new trucks and get them fixed before my old trucks even leave the road,” said Payne.

Overall, Payne was so impressed with the way Teletrac’s solution helped the company’s larger trucks, he got the service for the company’s fleet of 16 personal vehicles as well.

With Teletrac, customers are given data that increases visibility into each of their vehicle’s mechanics, helping them save in repairs and unseen problems. This insight is beneficial information to have on hand in order to maintain a strong-performing fleet.  

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Meeting the Challenge of Short-Haul Trucking

09/11/2015 by Parth Raval

The trucking industry can be divided into two basic groups – short-haul and long-haul. The trials of long-haul truckers are frequently discussed in the transportation industry. The demands placed on short-haul truckers, however, are often overlooked. Short-haul truckers, technically defined as employed drivers who travel and work within a 150-mile radius, face unique difficulties that should be equally important to fleet managers. Recognition of these difficulties can help fleet managers circumvent basic issues that impede the short-haul business.

One of the most difficult tasks that short-haul drivers face is backing up their vehicle’s trailer, a process called blind-siding. Having to complete multiple deliveries in a single day, short-haul drivers need to maneuver their trucks into loading docks multiple times. Blind-siding is a time-consuming process that requires careful use of the truck’s mirrors, stops and starts, and, sometimes, a spotter. With efficient routing, however, blind-siding need not throw off the timeline of a day’s deliveries – dispatchers can incorporate this time into their schedules to ensure jobs are still completed in a timely manner.

Short-haul drivers also need to contend more often with traffic and road construction. City streets and highways are more likely to have road work that necessitates re-routing to ensure a timely delivery. Dispatchers to need to ensure drivers have access to the most updated, efficient routes possible. With GPS fleet tracking, dispatchers can save these routes and send them to drivers to follow should the need arise.

Finally, short-haul truckers often have a more demanding schedule to adhere to. With more frequent pickups and deliveries, even a slight delay can have a domino effect on the rest of their delivery schedule. Short-haul drivers and dispatchers need to work together to ensure that schedules are as tight as possible and that delays are made up as quickly as possible.

Fleet management software can help short-haul dispatchers deliver loads, make up for lost time, and re-route for unexpected occurrences. With the live mapping and two-way communication features provided by this software, fleet managers find fewer surprises on the road and drivers have access to the best routing for their day’s work. 

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Lowering Fleet Costs With Telematics

09/09/2015 by Sarah Barbod

“Low cost” trucks, meaning those priced 15% to 20% lower than standard trucks in the same class, are fast becoming a popular choice for some carriers. The purchase price of vehicles has been climbing quickly in recent years, due in part to new safety and environmental regulations. According to a recent study by global consulting firm Frost and Sullivan, over the next seven years, demand for low cost trucks will rise. While safer and environmentally friendly trucks are a positive evolution of current vehicles, the improved machines cost more and fleets are challenged to cut costs in other areas of their operation to afford the new units.

The discount alternatives follow the regulations but cut corners in other places, such as driver comfort and mechanical longevity as they include smaller engines, powertrains, and none of the interior comforts required by long-haul drivers. As a result, low-cost trucks are unlikely to touch the long-haul market any time soon. But for last mile and local delivery work, vehicles without the interior and mechanical upgrades look increasingly attractive.

The budget problems that modern trucks cause are quite real, but there are solutions that do not involve buying substandard equipment.

Telematics providers, such as Teletrac, give fleet managers tools to help dramatically lower operating costs, such as Safety Analytics to improve driver training and coaching, and maintenance reports that catch unseen service repairs to prevent costly break-downs on the road.

Proactively monitoring vehicle activity can give a fleet manager deep insight into their driver’s behavior. Well trained drivers, who obey speed limits, avoid excessive idling and excessive acceleration, harsh braking, and otherwise practice safe driving, reduce the risk of receiving road violations and fines, and experience fewer accidents. As a result, insurance companies are willing to give fleets that incorporate telematics lower premiums and discounts.

When a business has customers waiting for service, Teletrac’s maintenance feature allows managers to keep track of routine maintenance schedules for their entire fleet to ensure vehicles are in top form, and deliveries are made on time. Managers can also read any fault codes remotely with the vehicle diagnostic report feature so that they can make arrangements for repairs before the vehicle breaks down on the road. Overall, the manager has a more efficient tool to plan ahead so that if a truck ends up in the shop, it is less likely to disrupt fleet operations. Simple problems are more likely to be caught early, reducing maintenance costs and improving engine function to use less fuel.

And less fuel burned means less greenhouse gas emissions.

The purpose of the new Federal regulations is to reduce the carbon footprint of America’s trucking industry and increase safety on our roads. Skilled, careful drivers help make our roads safe and reduce fuel use, thus cutting operating costs and a fleet’s carbon footprint. By incorporating a telematics solution, fleet owners can stay compliant and reduce costs, whether or not they purchase low cost trucks.

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