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Keeping Drivers Safe Over the Holiday Season

12/16/2015 by Sarah Barbod

With the arrival of the holiday season, celebrations are in full swing. And the U.S. Department of Transportation (US DOT) National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has started their Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign to prevent drunk and impaired driving over the holiday. 

But according to the NHTSA’s 2014 Roadside Survey of Alcohol and Drug Use by Drivers, the drunk driving rate is down. The survey involved administering anonymous drug and alcohol tests to volunteers recruited directly from the highways in all 50 states. Very few drivers (between one and nine percent) tested positive for any amount of alcohol, and even fewer tested as over the legal limit—a drop of 80% since the first Survey in 1973.

However, the survey indicates the use of marijuana and other drugs has increased, raising new concerns about driver attention span while under the influence of a drug, and the subsequent effect on road safety.   

Impaired driving, for any reason, is a problem, especially for drivers behind the wheel of a big rig. Companies that manage a fleet of vehicles can closely monitor each of their drivers’ behavior on the road by investing in GPS fleet management software with a safety feature.  This software can help fleet managers ensure their professional drivers are not contributing to dangerous driving practices.  

Teletrac Navman’s celebrated partnership with HERE, a mapping and location technology company, allows the Safety Analytics feature to draw on more on-the-ground detail than ever before. With HERE’s web API integration for stop sign and speeding metrics, Safety Analytics can indicate where stop signs are located and if a driver passes through a sign without stopping. With speeding, HERE’s integration allows users to gauge the posted speed limit of a location with the actual speed of the vehicle. Violations of these incidents are triggered on the map. The event is then recorded so that fleet managers can bring drivers back to the office to discuss areas of improvement, or take disciplinary action with the driver for the violation.

Safety Analytics gives fleet managers deep insight into how their drivers are performing on the road, where their vehicles are going, how fast their vehicles are operating, and ultimately if their driver’s behavior is putting the company and other drivers on the road in jeopardy.

Teletrac Navman customer, Poolman Inc., a large pool service company in Arizona with a fleet of 70 vehicles, created a monthly driver incentive program with the driver scores collected from Safety Analytics. The program helped Poolman drivers practice safe and smart driving habits. The company’s insurance also gave them a discount just for having the software installed.

As we progress through this holiday season, companies that invest in GPS fleet management software with a safety feature can catch impaired driving, prevent accidents, reduce costs, and dramatically improve safety across their entire fleet.

And that is something to really celebrate. 

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Holidays – A Logistics Problem

12/14/2015 by Parth Raval

The winter holiday season is a heavily conflicted time for Americans. On one hand, it’s a time for family, tradition, and reflection. On the other hand, it is a massive business undertaking that involves several different industries working in tandem. Total holiday retail sales for 2014 topped $616.1 billion, with $514.2 billion devoted to in-store sales (National Retail Federation). Those in-store sales don’t happen by themselves. Products bought off the shelves at big-box retailers have to first be transported to those retailers – that’s a big reason why the winter holiday season is one of the busiest times of the year for transportation (Logistics Management). Over 290,000,000 packages are delivered between Black Friday and Christmas Eve (Supply Chain 24/7). Behind the scenes of the holiday is a supply-chain orchestration that goes largely unnoticed by the public. December combines two pillars of American culture – adherence to tradition and a drive for commerce.

Interestingly, transportation encapsulates these pillars better than many industries. Long-haul trucking companies are the backbone of American commerce, bringing products to stores year-round. They are also the backbone of American tradition. Trucking has strong ties to Middle America – truck driving is the most common job in 29 states, most of them in the country’s interior, firmly settled with traditional American values (NPR). Traditional American values have strong connections to the winter holiday season. With debate continuing nationally surrounding the traditional and secular aspects of the season, trucking companies reside at the heart of the matter. They represent both sides of the argument, the push for tradition and the demand for business.

These questions do not have much bearing on the supply-chain and logistics problems that transportation companies wrestle with at this time of year. They do, however, reassert the centrality of trucking in America, both during the winter holidays and year-round. Every product bought during the holiday rush represents this tension just as much as does the trucker who spent three years in a row away from him family on Christmas so that he could make his deliveries on time (WWAY TV). It may be the most wonderful time of the year; it is also one of the most complex. 

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Pilot Program Aims to SHIFT Driver Health for the Better

12/10/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

Long-haul trucking can be physically debilitating. Without much opportunity for exercise, and with fast food often the most convenient form of sustenance, drivers have a hard time not packing on the pounds. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), long-haul drivers have almost double the rate of obesity in comparison to the general public. That leads to a much higher risk for other health problems, such as diabetes and heart disease. But now a real solution could be on the way.

Driver health is, of course, important in its own right. America’s economy in large part depends upon its professional drivers, and it is to everyone’s best interest to provide these men and women a work environment that is productive and healthy. But with current conditions, worsening health is a likely reason why so many drivers leave the field so quickly. The driver shortage has eased somewhat in recent years, but it is still on track to reach 175,000 by 2024 and annual turnover is around 83 percent, according to the American Trucking Associations (ATA). Hiring and training a driver can cost three times his or her annual salary—not helping drivers stay healthy is expensive.

Most seriously for the general public, one of the problems associated with obesity is sleep apnea, a condition that prevents sufferers from getting adequate rest. Exhausted driving is a major risk factor for accidents. Although trucks crash much less often than private vehicles, they are more likely to kill other people when they do. Five years ago, 85 percent of those killed in large truck crashes were not the drivers themselves, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Now, thanks to a $2.6 million government grant, the National Institute of Health (NIH) is attempting to address the problem using a new program called SHIFT (Safety and Health Involvement for Truckers). In partnership with the Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU), SHIFT is a 6-month program designed for truckers that combines competition, computer-based training, behavioral self-monitoring, and motivational interviewing—all tactics shown to help with weight loss in previous scientific studies.

So far, SHIFT has only been implemented as a pilot study, but the results suggest the program works better than earlier weight-loss interventions aimed at truckers. Participants significantly changed their diets and lost an average of almost eight pounds over the six-month program.

Of course, the key question is whether participants can maintain their healthier lifestyles after SHIFT is over. Most previous studies did not collect follow-up data, but those that did showed that participants maintained less than a third of their weight-loss after a year. Whether SHIFT can do better is unclear, although follow-up interviews 30 months after the pilot program was over showed that some participants did maintain their weight loss and some lost additional weight. The addition of a maintenance component to the program would probably improve results.

SHIFT is just a pilot program for now, but it does show promise. And if America’s long-haul truckers can get the support they need to work safer and healthier, that will be better for everybody.

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ELDs Are Now Law

12/10/2015 by Parth Raval

After months of anticipation, the FMCSA has announced that it will release its rule concerning ELD use on December 11, 2015. Companies will have two years to become compliant, or four years if they already use an electronic device to record driver hours. The time to comply is now - all carriers who are required to track their drivers’ hours are required to comply with this rule. These carriers can be further divided into two groups – those who currently use paper logs and those who use Automatic On-Board Recording Devices (AOBRDs.)

Paper logs have long been used to track drivers’ hours of service (HOS) in line with federal regulations. The ELD mandate is designed to create safer road conditions by allowing companies to closely track driver work hours and give drivers time to rest. Companies that use paper logs have two years to replace those logs with ELDs. Companies that use AOBRDs, on the other hand, have four years to comply with the mandate. AOBRDs are similar to ELDs in that they electronically record drivers’ HOS. The crucial difference is that ELDs are connected to the vehicle’s electronic control module and AOBRDs are not. This connection allows ELDs to validate HOS information with data collected from the vehicle’s computer.

Teletrac has closely followed the ELD mandate since the federal government announced it was rewriting the federal rule. Teletrac has always prioritized adherence to government regulations. When the FMCSA announced the change in the 34-hour restart rule, it required modifications in all electronic logging systems. Teletrac’s engineers were able to create a new, federally compliant system in 30 days. Many telematics providers still have not been able to adjust to that change in the rule. With this history of thorough and accurate software development, Teletrac will continue to be able to provide software that keeps companies compliant.

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Combating Manager Fears- How to Tackle Theft

12/04/2015 by Sarah Barbod

In 2013, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) estimated a total of 699,594 motor vehicle thefts nationwide. These thefts were accompanied by more than $4.1 billion in losses, averaging at $5,972 per stolen vehicle. For businesses with a fleet of vehicles, security against theft and unauthorized usage of assets is critically important to the success of the company. But with help from GPS fleet management software, businesses are able to track their vehicles before it’s too late.

Teletrac customer, Desert Limo Services, had first-hand experience tracking a stolen vehicle. As the Founder and CEO of the company, Kevin Blain, arrived to the office one morning, he discovered one of his limos was missing. After checking with employees and security members, he realized he may be faced with a stolen vehicle case. He notified the police, and simultaneously utilized his stolen vehicle tracking system from his GPS fleet management software to view detailed information about his vehicle in real-time from the live interactive map view. The thief was not aware there was a tracking unit installed within the vehicle. And Blain was able to collaborate with police to follow and quickly recover his stolen vehicle.

Fleet managers don’t need to wait until they notice something is missing around the office to call the police, as Kevin Blain resorted to for his company. With a GPS fleet management solution, managers can be notified instantly of unauthorized vehicle usage in order to take a proactive approach to theft prevention. Geo-fences, areas defined electronically by a user and displayed on a live map, provide landmarks and perimeters for the fleet. If a vehicle travels outside of a land-marked zone or operates during off hours, managers can be notified via automatic alerts of the vehicle’s activity. These features empower managers to keep tabs on their vehicles 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The most up-to-the-minute fleet updates can be configured for any time.

When a vehicle goes missing, time is critical. Any cargo or valuable equipment accompanying the vehicle can also be in danger of theft. Making an investment in a fleet management solution can not only save vehicles, but prevent the loss of money for the business as a whole. Staying connected to a fleet every mile of the way—location, movement, vehicle and mileage data generated from GPS tracking—allows companies to assure their fleet of vehicles are efficient and safe.

Teletrac offers a round the clock call line to help track stolen vehicles. Teletrac customers can call 1-800-ITS-STOLEN for help.

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How 35,000 Letters Got Left Behind Before Fleet Vehicles

12/04/2015 by Parth Raval

In 1861, the fastest way to get a package from St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California was on horseback. The Pony Express maintained a series of relay stations stretching across the Great Plains, the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada that saved 10 days of transportation time and delivered 35,000 letters during its service. It’s an indelible part of American culture – Pony Express t-shirts, shows, books and movies live on, telling a romantic tale of adventure in the Old West. It’s the first example of American transportation seen in a rosy light.

This is fortunate because popular culture is the only place the Pony Express was a success. In nearly every business category, it was a massive failure. Pony Express riders were able to carry letters quickly but the high cost of the route meant that the enterprise suffered a net loss of $110,000 (almost $3,000,000 in today’s currency.) It cost the equivalent of $130 to send a letter. Riders traveled through the country’s most inhospitable terrain. Founded with the idea of creating a profitable business, the Pony Express survived a mere nineteen months before the transcontinental railroad made it obsolete. An idea went from groundbreaking to meaningless in less than two years.

Today, the notion of moving goods by horseback is preposterous. The transcontinental railroad pushed out the Pony Express; one hundred years later, airplanes and trucks have removed businesses’ reliance on the railroad. In the technology world, this is natural and inevitable.

An industry’s mainstay can become outdated overnight. It happens again and again in transportation. The industry today faces a similar change with electronic logging devices (ELDs). For years, paper logs ruled when and how drivers worked. ELDs represent a step forward. The hesitation and criticism facing these products are a natural part of change. To be sure, ELDs are not the end the story. Engineers are working on the next phase of transportation, one that includes driverless vehicles and automated deliveries. When that happens, the world will have to again adjust. Businesses will become absorbed with fleet management technology, ensuring their assets are safe and properly maintained. Until then, businesses have to keep up or risk being left behind, like the Pony Express stations that are still scattered across the American West.

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Trucking is Looking for a Few Good Troops

12/02/2015 by Sarah Barbod

The movement of freight and products is constant. The American Trucking Associations estimates trucks hauled nearly 10 billion tons of freight in 2014. The freight reached America’s retail stores, restaurants, grocery stores, etc., proving that the trucking industry is crucial to the sustainment of our economy. And with a shortage of drivers, now hitting 35,000 to 40,000 drivers in the truckload sector, recruiting and retaining talent to transport our goods is more important than ever.

To combat the driver shortage issue, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has been recruiting new drivers from the talented pool of U.S. veterans and their spouses. The Commercial Motor Vehicle-Operator Safety Training (CMV-OST) grant program was established ten years ago by Congress through the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act – A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) in order to give America’s commercial drivers more and better safety training. One of the main goals of CMV-OST has been to help military families. And last year, two policy changes enhanced that goal: the Military Skills Test Waiver Program, which allows states to waive the skills test for veterans who drove trucks for the military, has been expanded to all 50 states. And secondly, returning military service members with a limb impairment and an accompanying Skill Performance Evaluation (SPE) certificate will be able to go through a simplified process to obtain an interstate commercial driver’s license (CDL), as the veteran SPE certificate will be recognized as the equivalent of the FMCSA’s SPE certificate.

This year also marks a substantial expansion of the grant program, with the total amount awarded more than doubling from $1 million in 2014, to $2.3 million this year. The number of recipient programs, all technical or community colleges, increased from ten to 14.

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) recognizes the valuable skill-set veterans can bring to the trucking profession. DOT Secretary Anthony Fox states, “We can think of none more appropriate to safeguard our highways as commercial vehicle drivers than the thousands of veterans who have already proven they can safely handle large vehicles under extremely stressful circumstances.”

In addition to government support, private organizations and non-profits such as hirepatriots.com, also help veterans find their way into trucking by holding job fairs or offering other supportive services. Some carriers have reached out to veterans through focused recruitment drives and by offering special training programs or benefits such as a higher starting pay rate for drivers with military experience.

Combating the driver shortage issue will certainly take time. But, by incorporating veterans into the driver talent pool, their specialized skills and training from their job in the service can certainly be a great asset to safely trucking on America’s highways. 

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How $50.2 Billion in Exports Came to America’s Shore in the 21st Century

11/24/2015 by Sarah Barbod & Parth Raval

In 1620, the Mayflower sailed from Plymouth, England to what is today called Provincetown Harbor, Massachusetts. The ship carried around 100 passengers, 30 crewmembers, and 180 casks of wine. Crossing the Atlantic during storm season was a treacherous journey that lasted roughly two-and-a-half months, leaving one crew member dead and countless passengers seasick.

Plenty has changed since then. Today, the sea voyage between England and the United States takes one week. Ships are built of steel and can weather the North Atlantic swells with ease. The amount of cargo traveling across the ocean has also increased. According to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), over 90% of current world trade is carried by sea. The International Chamber of Shipping boasts over 50,000 merchant ships trading internationally, with a registered world fleet in over 150 countries, and approximately one million workers of almost every nationality. Since most of the world’s manufactured products are carried via container ships, there’s a good chance that the clothes you’re wearing and the electronic device you’re reading this article on were first carried on a container ship before a truck transported them over land.

The fleets of vessels traveling the ocean in the 17th century were of no competition to the container ships of today. The Mayflower is estimated to have been 100 feet long, 25 feet wide, and 12 feet below the waterline. Records show the wine casks were large barrels that accommodated hundreds of gallons of liquid in the cargo hold.

In stark contrast, container ships of the 21st century are now the ballasts of modern trade. They are able to carry thousands of tons of product in one trip, greatly facilitating international trade. The world’s largest container ships stretch across four football field lengths and can carry 28,880,000 cubic feet of products. That’s about one banana for every person in Europe. Today, major shipping lanes connect the United Kingdom with the United States. Products coming from England to America usually leave the Port of London and arrive in the Port of New York and New Jersey five to seven days later. The most common exports from the United Kingdom are cars, followed by refined petroleum, packaged medicaments, and gas turbines. The ships that carry them have over 100,000 horsepower and can be run by crews as small as 13 people. The Mayflower had a crew of 30 and would have been lucky to reach 30 horsepower in good conditions.

Because of the primitive navigation tools of the time, ships were commonly set off-course or lost at sea. Today, GPS tracking technology allows cargo to be monitored in rugged environments anywhere in the globe. Assets traveling by ship first stop at ports, load onto trucks, travel to the local store, and end up in a consumers’ hand. The journey is digitally documented to ensure safety, efficiency, and cost-effective transport. Data gathered from the GPS devices are used to report real-time locations, statuses, and time stamps of events providing companies with useful information. The more key data businesses have about their assets, the better decisions they can make.

Since the Mayflower set sail from the southern coast of England, international trade has evolved into an impressive scale. The same route that brought English settlers to North America in the 17th century now brings in $50.2 billion in exports every year. The United States is England’s first stop and top destination for exports. And the journey to America has evolved into an efficient and more connected sea voyage that now includes the latest tracking technology, ensuring people and goods are safely transported.   

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The King of Cool and Telematics

11/24/2015 by Parth Raval

It’s one of the most unforgettable chases put on film – police lieutenant Frank Bullitt, played by the eternally cool Steve McQueen, speeds through San Francisco in pursuit of two criminals. In a 1968 Ford Mustang, McQueen skids around corners, bounces down inclines and leaves tire marks on asphalt, relentlessly chasing the men across the city. Revolutionary for its speed, intensity and realism, the chase scene in Bullitt poses special interest to those who work with vehicles. For them, it’s the Ford Mustang, not McQueen, who is the real star of the scene.

A Ford Mustang may not be the vehicle used in typical fleets but to watch Bullitt with a fleet manager’s eyes opens up interesting possibilities. Indeed, if Bullitt were set in modern times and the lieutenant’s supervisors had implemented fleet management technology in his vehicle, the movie we know would be entirely different. Fleet management technology bridges the gap between dispatchers and drivers. It does so by way of a black box that connects to the vehicle’s engine. This black box sends location updates, alerts, and event replays to the system’s interface – the software program the dispatcher uses to monitor the fleet.

The first signal to Bullitt’s supervisors that something was amiss would be when the lieutenant sharply rounds a corner as the pursuit takes him toward downtown. This would trigger a Harsh Cornering alert, indicating that the driver was handling the vehicle unsafely. This could also be replayed with an Event Viewer, which would visually display the speed, direction, and tilt of the vehicle as turned the corner. Bullitt’s sudden braking would trigger additional alerts, as well as aggravate the wear on his tires. His vehicle’s next service would need to be scheduled in the fleet management system so that his tires could be rotated, or changed if needed. That’s without considering his Mustang’s suspension – the steep hills and valleys of San Francisco streets bounced his vehicle up and down, dealing severe damage to the underbody. If Bullitt were a truck driver, he would have to worry about his CSA score taking a hit. As a police officer, public relations work would have to be done in the wake of his chase. Fleet management data, reports, and vehicle replays would all aid his supervisors in their argument that his actions were justified.

Bullitt was filmed in 1968, decades before fleet management software took shape. Today, law enforcement bodies can install hardware in their vehicles that detail everything from fuel consumption to idle time data. It makes for a stronger, more equipped police force. 

It also makes for disappointing car chases – a modern day Bullitt pursuit would end as soon as a dispatcher was alerted to send reinforcements. 

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Combating Manager Fears- How to Tackle Driver Shortage

11/19/2015 by Oswaldo Flores

Many carriers are looking to address the driver shortage issue by recruiting from untapped pools of talent, such as women. Young people graduating high school comprise another such pool. But while all 50 states allow 18-year-olds to acquire a CDL license, federal law prohibits anyone under 21 from driving commercial routes interstate. That rule creates a challenging situation to employ 18-to-21-year-old truck drivers.

The problem is not just that this one age group is excluded. By the time someone interested in a trucking career turns 21, he or she usually has the beginnings of a career in hand—a career in something other than long-haul trucking. Trucking can’t compete fairly against other career paths for talent because federal law regulates young talent to enter their profession three years later.

Congress is considering lifting the ban against young interstate drivers and studying the possibility of having 18-year olds driving heavy trucks with a pilot program. But the subject is controversial. Concerns from safety groups have mounted, including the Truck Safety Coalition, stating that in addition to having higher crash risks, teen drivers do not have the experience necessary to safely operate trucks.  

One possibility for training is to institute a program similar to the graduated license programs for younger teens learning to drive a car. Typically, these programs create a middle stage between a learner’s permit and a full license in which the teen may drive unsupervised but only during certain hours and without teen passengers. Some require the teen to turn 18 before getting the unrestricted license. Such programs do seem to reduce fatal car accidents for teen drivers, especially when combined with other restrictions, such as the loss of the license if the teen is ever found with alcohol. Although the details of a graduated CDL might have to be a little different, the principle of easing young people into the driver’s seat has promise to combat the driver shortage problem.

According to a recent economic news release from the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment number among youth 16 to 24 years old has increased by 2.1 million between April to July of this year. With so many eager young people entering America’s workforce, the trucking industry can use this energy to implement new vocational training for recent high school grads and help open the door into a career in trucking.

Some in the industry want to go even farther by reaching out to young teens and even children. Many kids are fascinated by big trucks and they may like to hear about how they can have an opportunity to drive one someday. A dream planted early could lead to a career later down the line.

*About the author: Oswaldo Flores is a member of Teletrac's marketing team. He is an expert in product management in the transportation sector for the United States and Mexico.  

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What is an Engine Control Module?

11/18/2015 by Parth Raval

Buried in the definition of “electronic logging device (ELD)” is this phrase: “engine control module (ECM).” Yet another acronym that gets mentioned when the subject of federal compliance comes up, ECMs are the heart of modern vehicles. Simply put, they are computers that control electronic systems within the vehicles. They control how the engine runs, monitor vehicle performance, and issue fault codes when something goes wrong. They deploy the airbags upon impact, or hold an airbag back if an occupant’s weight is too low. They are at the center of modern vehicle operations. And they will soon be on every over-the-road carrier’s radar – ECMs are also at the center of the ELD mandate.

To understand why ECMs are central to the ELD mandate, it’s important to understand the wealth of information ECMs can provide businesses. Fleet management software lives and breathes by diagnostic information. Through a connection to the ECM, fleet managers can do much more than read fault codes. They can tell when a driver has applied the brakes too hard, signaling unsafe road conditions. They can see how much fuel their fleet has used sitting at traffic lights and jobsites. Tapping into an ECM breaks down a business into simple numbers. It provides the raw data needed to push a fleet forward.

In the varied history of federal compliance devices, ECMs only recently entered the conversation. AOBRDs, or Automatic On Board Recording Devices, do not have an integral connection to the vehicle. These devices are currently regulated by the federal government and do not have a built in method to validate the data that is entered. ELDs take care of that problem by connecting to the vehicle’s ECM. This connection enables the ELD to automatically record when the vehicle starts and stops, creating an accurate portrait of a driver’s work day. ELDs also provide a wealth of information regarding a vehicle’s fuel use, maintenance needs, regular and irregular usage, and safety performance. This pushes an ELD past its obvious use – tracking driver hours – into a device that can reside at the heart of a fleet’s operations, just as an ECM is the center of a vehicle’s operations. The right device can help a company run smarter, not harder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What Factors Lead To Driver Retention?

11/11/2015 by Caroline Ailanthus

As the trucking industry faces a high turnover rate of 87% this year, according to Bob Costello of American Trucking Associations, keeping drivers happy with their fleet has definitely been a challenge. But there are a number of drivers who stay loyal to their carrier. And EpicVue recently conducted a study on drivers to learn the top reasons why they stay with a particular company.

For the study, various fleets were polled about employee loyalty, inquiring about what percent of each fleet’s drivers had worked less than one year, between one to five years, five to 10 years, and over 10 years, and what actions were taken to improve retention. Most fleets had predominantly new drivers, but that didn’t always mean the fleet had a retention problem since some carriers had recently hired a lot of new people due to company growth. Those companies able to inspire loyalty did so through a variety of innovative programs, for example: soliciting ideas and feedback from drivers and acting on some of those ideas; providing company email addresses and iPhones to help drivers stay in touch; and putting managers through ethics and management classes.

The study also included a survey of over-the-road drivers contacted at truck stops. Approximately 270 drivers completed the survey. They ranged in age from the early 20’s, to over 50 years old. On average they had worked for their present employer for almost six years and spend two to three weeks away from home at a stretch. The survey asked three basic questions: Besides money, what is the best part of being a professional truck driver? In addition to a paycheck, what is the best part of working for your particular fleet? What makes you most loyal to your employer?

At the top of the list, 37% of drivers favored employers that were respectful, friendly, and kind. Then 26% of drivers valued the independence of the job, followed by 25% who gave their loyalty to companies that listen to suggestions and offer good incentives and benefits. The numbers reveal drivers’ humanistic needs and desires to work for companies that respect them as people, respect their autonomy, and respect their abilities with comprehensive benefits.

Fleets that focus on finding ways to involve drivers in decision-making, respect drivers’ ideas, and make drivers feel like they are valued at the company, are more likely to experience longevity and driver satisfaction with their employer. If implemented industry wide, these company values might be the answer to lower the driver turnover rate. 

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